It’s one of the oldest and most proven ways to make money – buy low, sell high. The buy low part comes from searching garage sales, estate sales, and even thrift stores to find items that are in good condition (“gently used”) but selling well below what they would if they were brand-new. In this way, you might be able to acquire an item for $5, and later sell it for $50.
I don't  hunk there's anything wrong with wanting to make lots of money. But once you have achieved that will you just keep doing the same thing tirelessly?  Or, would you like to enjoy the benefits of making a lot of money?  My point is this. Do something that will enrich you, not just richen you. Because, when you have completed this task what will be your legacy?  I believe; in the end most people want to accomplish something more than just making a lot of money. Though making a lot of money can be a byproduct of doing something that brings you and others happiness. When you die the last things you will have are your conscience and your memories. By that point the money won't matter anymore.
People who do well are afraid of the government, the media, and bitter people all around.  They are afraid they will be hunted down by organizations who will tie you up and burn you at the stake.  You don’t know how many conversations I’ve had with people who are just so agitated they can’t spend 1/10th their income on a car because that would mean they’d be spending $50,000-$150,000, which is fancy by “normal” standards but is absolutely whatever by their standards!  Instead, they spend 1/20th to 1/50th of their income on a car because anything more than a $28,000 Honda Accord will be frowned upon.
I think you’re right. People resent you if you make more money than they do and I certainly think we hide it well. I don’t know though. I think it might be that rich people don’t need or want to flaunt their money. I know in my case, almost all the technicians at work have homes that are MUCH more expensive than ours. They max out how much they can borrow so they can show their peers they’ve “made it”.
Build your audience on a course community: If you’re just getting started building an audience for yourself and want to leverage communities already actively looking for content you can choose to host and sell your online course on a site like Skillshare or Udemy. These are easy, cost-effective ways to build an audience and test your niche to see if there’s demand for it.

If you are good at writing notes and attended all lectures, you can sell your asserts to less committed students via NoteSale. You can create a listing for free, but the site will take a per cent from each of your sales. Typed notes in PDF/Text format sell best, yet it’s worth trying with scanned handwritten notes too if you have nice clear writing.


Now, it’s time to start creating and uploading content. Make sure you’re using a high-enough quality camera (most smartphones will work but I’d suggest at least having a tripod so your footage isn’t shaky), but don’t worry about being perfect at first. The beauty of YouTube is that you can continue to test out different content and styles as you find what works for you. Instead, stick to a regular schedule to build up your subscriber base.
Need more ideas on how to make money online? Another strategy is using webinars to market your product, service, or course. I’ve done webinars to promote my financial planning practice and to drum up interest in my online course for financial advisors. With a webinar, you’re basically offering a lot of tips and advice for free — usually in a live format. At the end though, you pitch your paid product or service with the goal of securing a few deals.
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