Identify a consumer need. Pinpoint a specific problem or inconvenience that many consumers have. Be as precise about the issue as you can. Write down the issue and consider what produce or service might solve this problem. This can be a physical thing or it might be a service you offer. For example, you could build a product like a car or you could provide a service where you repair cars.
If you’ve ever dreamed of having a pet sitting business, then this one’s for you! Today we’re talking about Rover, a site that makes it possible to earn money as a pet sitter by connecting you to potential clients who need pet-sitting services. Rover has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and The Los Angeles Times… Read More
I suspect there’s a lot of selection bias in those numbers, ie who are you/Bloomberg asking (or who is willing to divulge what they make)? For example, Google/Facebook. Yes, some engineers at those companies are most certainly making 6-figure salaries, but the majority of those companies are not engineers and are definitely not making anywhere near that. As far as the millions in stock, that’s a total pipe dream. Sure, a few of the lucky (and super talented) engineers that got in on the ground floor may have a hefty amount of options, but the vast majority likely have much more modest amounts. Don’t get me wrong, they are both great companies to work for (I have had the opportunity to work for both at one time or another), but they’re not the millionaire-makers everyone paints them to be. :)
Getting a raise is harder than getting a promotion.  Think about it from your boss’s perspective, would you rather a) pay more money for the same service, or b) pay more money for additional responsibilities. Regardless, sometimes a raise is in order, especially if you have worked for several years without one. Check out Ramit Sethi’s guide on asking for a raise.
If you’re looking for inspiration, my friend Michelle Schroeder-Gardner of the website Making Sense of Sense has become the expert on all things affiliate marketing. Michelle earns more than $100,000 per month from her blog and the bulk of her income comes from affiliate sales. Michelle has had so much success with affiliate marketing that she even has her own course called Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
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